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woman who reads too much

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11:40 am: books for boys
While he was still in Montreal Mungo wrote
I've read all the books I brought with me & half of my neighbors. When I come back to Colorado can I borrow some to take with me? (What I'm really asking is if you'll make me a pile that you think I might like)
I know it's a pain because you don't know what type of books I like & i apologize, I just don't really know what things I like in a book either as silly as it sounds


I do wonder where he is finding all this time to read, but let's not talk about that. In the twelve days he's been home he read We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, all of Digger, Dodger, and now he's reading Swimming To Antarctica, which was one of his dad's suggestions.

When he was a little boy, I was very good at picking out books for him; the geeky little boy in me had excellent taste. It's been a lot harder since he started high school.

My suggestions so far:

The Magicians, by Lev Grossman
Leviathan Wakes, by James S.A. Corey
Fool on the Hill, by Matt Ruff
Moo, by Jane Smiley
All Over Creation, by Ruth Ozeki
The Diamond Age, by Neal Stephenson
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie
House of Leaves, by Mark Z. Danielewski
Good Omens, by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
Foreigner, by C. J. Cherryh
whatever I've got on the shelves by Kurt Vonnegut

I keep being tempted to put Oglaf on the stack, opening it, and realizing that no that would be weird.

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Comments

[User Picture]
From:randomdreams
Date:January 2nd, 2015 10:28 pm (UTC)
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I've never seen an/the Oglaf book.

I'd point him at the Chanur series rather than Foreigner, but I don't have a strong reason for doing that. Likewise, lone ranger and tonto fistfight rather than part-time indian. But Moo is a great choice, my favorite of hers.
N found House Of Leaves terrifying. I mostly found it ... borderline pretentious, for lack of a better term, like, trying to do the same general thing Pynchon does, which leaves me wondering if he's actually so bright I missed a bunch or if he's just typing whatever comes to mind.
[User Picture]
From:boxofdelights
Date:January 4th, 2015 03:01 am (UTC)
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Chanur is my favorite! I thought Foreigner might be easier to get into for someone who is not accustomed to reading SF. I'll start the next stack with Lone Ranger and Tonto.
[User Picture]
From:randomdreams
Date:January 4th, 2015 03:45 am (UTC)
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It's my fave too.
[User Picture]
From:beaq
Date:January 3rd, 2015 07:20 am (UTC)
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At that age, me …

m.

Has he done Jeeves & Wooster, and Douglas Adams? I assume so, but.

Does he like words for words' sake? Nicholson Baker (maybe The Mezzanine? Not Vox, not from his mom, my god, he'll find it on his own.), Annie Dillard (Pilgrim at Tinker Creek). Obvs not just words, but def. for the reader who is enchanted by a writer's voice and by language in general. Dillard is … like, deep, man. Hypnotic. Kind of heady for a late teen. Maybe. Maybe.

Has he done ye oldes? Hawthorne, Melville? I guess that's for if he's of a romantic and literary bent. Rosetti, that stuff. Throw some Norton anthologies at him.

Jodawi read a lot of stuff in his youth that I couldn't get into then: Gertrude Stein, that bunch. Stand on Zanzibar? The Majipoor Chronicles? Delaney?
[User Picture]
From:beaq
Date:January 3rd, 2015 07:29 am (UTC)
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If he does like Cherryh, then maybe Robin Hobb? Why I draw the connection, not sure.

The Liaden universe? (Harper and Lee, space opera, fun.)

If I'd known about Octavia Butler when I was in college, I'd've been hooked for good. Zenna Henderson? Kage Baker? Connie Willis?
[User Picture]
From:beaq
Date:January 3rd, 2015 07:43 am (UTC)
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Plus, I thought your suggestions were good. I'd read up all that shit.

(Has he also read William Gibson? Iain M Banks?)


(OK done now. :) )
[User Picture]
From:beaq
Date:January 3rd, 2015 07:51 am (UTC)
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(Added We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves to the infinite "to read" list.)
[User Picture]
From:boxofdelights
Date:January 4th, 2015 02:49 am (UTC)
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It is worth it. Warn for terrible animal cruelty.
[User Picture]
From:boxofdelights
Date:January 4th, 2015 02:59 am (UTC)
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Yes Douglas Adams, no Jeeves and Wooster books, but an episode or two of the TV show.

He stopped reading SF in his first year of high school. He said, "I'm not a geek anymore, mom," although that was about recreational mathematics, not reading material. But he isn't into words qua words either. He writes good essays, but his first semester at college was Calculus, Chemistry, Physics, and a nursing class, and he didn't mind the lack of the Humanities.
[User Picture]
From:maribou
Date:January 3rd, 2015 08:25 am (UTC)
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That is a splendid list.
[User Picture]
From:desayunoencama
Date:January 5th, 2015 07:44 am (UTC)
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Maybe Carl Hiaasen?

The Rex Stouts or Erle Stanley Gardners might also be good. Although he'll rip right through them...
From:urban_homestead
Date:January 9th, 2015 07:50 pm (UTC)
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Connie Willis? I love all her books but her newest two-volume novel Blackout/All Clear are the best ever.

Apologies if you already know, but, we just saw that Dreamworks is making a film out of the True Meaning of Smekday! Arthur jumped out of his cinema seat with excitement during the trailer as soon as he recognized Gratuity and Pig. Thank you again for the novel, which both my children loved.
From:urban_homestead
Date:January 9th, 2015 07:51 pm (UTC)
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Oh! Another set of books I loved last year: NK Jemison's Inheritance trilogy.
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