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woman who reads too much

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02:29 pm: books for my nieces
I've got two nieces, 10 and 13, both read a lot. The last time I saw them, I gave the 13-year-old A Natural History of Dragons. Turns out she *loves* dragons, so I lucked out there. The book she was reading was The Life of Pi. I gave the 10-year-old The True Meaning of Smekday, which I was worried might be a little young for her, but I love that book so much I wanted to share it, and it turns out that like most avid readers, she enjoys things intended for older and younger people.

So I'm casting my mind around for Christmas presents. I haven't read Uprooted, but it seems very popular among my reading list. Maybe Seraphina, but a kid who loves dragons has probably read it already. The Cloud Roads wouldn't be too mature for a kid who chose to read Life of Pi, right?

Do you have any suggestions?

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From:eeyorerin
Date:December 12th, 2015 12:11 am (UTC)
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There are sequels to A Natural History of Dragons, so if she has not read those yet, might she enjoy them?

I quite enjoyed The Diviners and Lair of Dreams by Libba Bray, and they are marketed as Young Adult.

Gordon Korman's books are hilarious if you are looking for lighter fiction. I loved No More Dead Dogs.
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From:boxofdelights
Date:December 13th, 2015 07:14 am (UTC)
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Thank you! The only Libba Bray I've read is Beauty Queens, but I've been meaning to try others.
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From:blamebrampton
Date:December 12th, 2015 12:30 am (UTC)
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It's not dragons, but for spooky and beautifully written books in which girls have agency and boys are often true friends (one has a boy hero with a girl who is a true friend ;-) ) Frances Hardinge is reliably excellent.
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From:pennski
Date:December 12th, 2015 07:11 pm (UTC)
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Yes to this.
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From:boxofdelights
Date:December 13th, 2015 06:21 am (UTC)
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Oh, excellent suggestion. I think 10 is the perfect age for Fly By Night. I haven't read A Face Like Glass yet but my daughter loved it.
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From:blamebrampton
Date:December 13th, 2015 08:45 am (UTC)
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It was splendid! Verdigris Deep (er, maybe Well Witched in the US?) is a good option, too, because it is set in England 'now' and so a bit more accessible, but it sounds as though she is already a keen fantasy reader, so Mosca and Saracen! And the sequel is equally good. The Lost Conspiracy is simply magnificent, though there is a lot of death in it, which can be a drawback for some kids.

Cuckoo Song and the newest one that I am temporarily drawing a blank on are a little more terrifying, so may be better read in the longer warmer days where nights are short and fears easily shaken off. I know I found them scary, and I'm nearly 50 ;-)

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From:adrian_turtle
Date:December 12th, 2015 04:58 am (UTC)
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No dragons, but girls doing science:
The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate is about an 11-year old girl in rural Texas at the turn of the last century. She's discovering how to be a scientist, and how (if?) science and the requisite independence of thought fits with being a woman her family wants her to be. I love how it's not a clean choice between femininity and science.

Green Glass Sea is about a couple of geeky girls, daughters of scientists at Los Alamos. Neither of them fit in with the little 7th grade class, for different reasons...one is an artist and the other is a scientist.

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From:adrian_turtle
Date:December 12th, 2015 05:12 am (UTC)
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Oh, a very different kind of dragon book is Owen, The Dragon-Slayer of Trondheim. It's brilliant, but the dragons are MONSTERS. They aren't magical beings you can talk to or negotiate with. They aren't fascinating like dinosaurs are to us. The story is a sort of alternate history, where dragons are like wild animals and forest fires, and any city or railroad needs a bunch of people to defend against them.
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From:pennski
Date:December 12th, 2015 07:12 pm (UTC)
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Oooh, Yes to "Green Glass Sea". I haven't read the other but it sounds good too.
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From:boxofdelights
Date:December 13th, 2015 07:15 am (UTC)
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That sounds really interesting.
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From:rozasharn
Date:December 12th, 2015 11:35 pm (UTC)
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If they haven't read them already, I recommend for the 13-year-old Nation by Terry Pratchett and/or The Hero and the Crown, by Robin McKinley.
Both of them might enjoy Castle Hangnail, by Ursula Vernon. Has some dragon-related content but is mainly friendship, adventure, loyalty against bullying, and humor.
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From:boxofdelights
Date:December 13th, 2015 07:16 am (UTC)
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I've been meaning to read Castle Hangnail!
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From:lcohen
Date:December 13th, 2015 12:25 pm (UTC)
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i've not read the life of pi but the cloud roads does have one scene where characters have sex, though there is no "and then he touched her thiis and smoothed her that" to it. moon also clearly has sex with males as well as females. but moon is a great character, trying to find his place in the world--perfect for a young person.
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From:bunnyjadwiga
Date:December 15th, 2015 05:52 pm (UTC)
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What about Robin McKinley's _DragonHaven_? It's not very well publicized in YA, so she might not have heard of it. Also, a blast from the past: Dragonsong, by Anne McCaffrey?
Anne Downer's Hatching Magic is for a younger age group but our whole family enjoyed reading it.
See if she's read the Enchanted Forest Chronicles-- they are also less recent and may not have come to her attention. "It's just not DONE, Cimorene!"
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